søndag 31. desember 2017

Godt Nytt År!

 
Andøya Airshow 2017 - Foto: Per Gram
 
 
Godt Nytt År til alle lesere
av
gramsluftfartsblogg.no

Beaver havarert i elv nær Sydney - The Mirror

Hawkesbury River seaplane crash: Six people killed after aircraft goes down near Cowan

Updated The journey from Cottage Point to Rose Bay would normally take 20 minutes.
Numerous rescue vessels, including NSW Police divers and NSW Ambulance helicopters, attended the scene.
Some debris has been retrieved but the plane remains 13 metres below water.



The crashed aircraft, a DHC-2 Beaver registration VH-NOO, was operated by Sydney Seaplanes.
A marine command centre has been established at Apple Tree Bay boat ramp near Bobbin Head in the Ku Ring Gai National Park, near Cowan.
Police will guard the wreckage overnight until investigators from the Australia Transport Safety Bureau arrive at the scene tomorrow morning.
Police are urging anyone who witnessed the accident to contact them.

Eyewitnesses said the aircraft turned sharply to the right shortly after taking off, before crashing.
The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) said the plane "sunk rapidly" after crashing into the river.
Police divers were flown to the scene, and all six bodies were recovered on Sunday evening.
"The sequence of events leading up to the accident are not yet understood," the ATSB said.

lørdag 30. desember 2017

Tåpelig programmeringsfeil førte til tap for mange millioner - Curt Lewis

Jeg har tidligere nevnt tapet av en norsk AIS-B satellitt. her er forklaringen, og den er ganske skremmende. Ikke noe QA der i gården. Den minner meg dessverere om en helikopterulykke med tap av liv i Norge, da koordinatene satt ved TO var fra feil offshore platform. (Red.) 

Russia Says Programming Error Caused Failure of Satellite Launch

FILE - A Russian Soyuz rocket, center in the background, carrying satellites stands on the launchpad at the new Vostochny Cosmodrome near Uglegorsk, in eastern Siberia in the Amur region, Russia, April 27, 2016.

MOSCOW - Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin said Wednesday that the failed launch of a 2.6 billion-ruble ($44.95 million) satellite last month was due to an embarrassing programming error.

Russian space agency Roscosmos said last month that it had lost contact with the newly launched weather satellite - the Meteor-M - after it blasted off from Russia's new Vostochny cosmodrome in the Far East.

Eighteen smaller satellites belonging to scientific, research and commercial companies from Russia, Norway, Sweden, the United States, Japan, Canada and Germany were on board the same rocket.

Speaking to Rossiya 24 state TV channel, Rogozin said the failure had been caused by human error.

The rocket carrying the satellites had been programmed with the wrong coordinates, he said, saying it had been given bearings for takeoff from a different cosmodrome - Baikonur - which Moscow leases from Kazakhstan.

"The rocket was really programmed as if it was taking off from Baikonur," said Rogozin. "They didn't get the coordinates right."

The Vostochny spaceport, laid out in the thick taiga forest of the Amur region, is the first civilian rocket launch site in Russia.

In April last year, after delays and massive costs overruns, Russia launched its first rocket from Vostochny, a day after a technical glitch forced an embarrassing postponement of the event in the presence of President Vladimir Putin.

Laser og droner økende problem for trafikkfly - Curt Lewis

NZ pilots want tougher penalties for laser attacks

Pilots want harsher penalties for those caught shining lasers at aircraft as the number of laser attacks continues to rise.

Civil Aviation Authority figures show that there were 155 reported laser incidents to the end of November this year, up from 152 incidents in total for 2016.

What may seem like a bit of innocuous fun can cause temporary blindness and put small aircraft passengers at risk, is the message from the New Zealand Air Line Pilot's Association.

"Lasers are not toys and pilots and air traffic controllers have been very concerned that it would only be a matter of time before a serious accident would result from such dangerous and irresponsible use," NZALPA President and airline pilot Tim Robinson said.

NZALPA is pushing for laser attacks to be considered an equivalent offence to high jacking and bomb threats.

Laser perpetrators can face up to three years in jail or a fine of $2000 if convicted of possession of a high-power laser or up to 14 years in jail if convicted under the Crimes Act for endangering transport.

Mr Robinson said pilots described the temporary blindness and resulting headaches caused by laser pointers "as one of the most terrifying things they've ever gone through".

Civil Aviation Authority spokeswoman Philippa Lagan said temporary blindness was really dangerous, especially for smaller aircraft and helicopters that only had one pilot onboard.

"While people may think it's a fun thing to do the implications are a massive concern."

Ms Lagan said they are working with police and the pilot's association to raise awareness of the risks but were also considering other options if the trend continued.

"If the number does continue to go up, a possibility could be lobbying the government to get bans on them," she said.

Indiske flygere og cabin crew synes å være særdeles begeistret for alkohol - Curt Lewis


'AI's 28 pilots and 9 cabin crew skipped alcohol test in 2017' (India)

As part of the safety regulations of Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA), all pilots and cabin crew must undergo the breath analyser (BA) test, before and after flights.

Twenty eight pilots and nine cabin crew of Air India skipped the mandatory alcohol test this year, the Centre informed parliament today.

As part of the safety regulations of Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA), all pilots and cabin crew must undergo the breath analyser (BA) test, before and after flights.

"As on 21.12.2017, 28 pilots and 9 cabin crew have skipped the BA test," Minister of State for Civil Aviation Jayant Sinha said in response to a question in Lok Sabha.

He said the license of these pilots and cabin crew were suspended for three months.

Any crew member, who tests positive in the pre-flight medical check or refuses to take a breath analyser test, is taken off flying duty for at least four weeks, and the airline is required to initiate disciplinary proceedings, according to civil aviation rules.

Air India was also involved in a controversy earlier this year when the DGCA warned that more than 500 of its pilots and crew could be grounded for skipping the alcohol test.

Then Air India CMD Rajiv Bansal had written to the DGCA, requesting it to take a lenient view as he said that the airline management had misinterpreted the rules and had taken corrective measures.

A320 neo med Pratt motorer har problemer - Curt Lewis

Dette gjelder ikke bare IndiGo, men alle selskaper som har kjøpt fly med denne typen motorer. (Red.)

India Grounds Hundreds of Airbus A-320 (NEO) flights Due to Technical Snag 

The recurrent technical snag in Pratt & Whitney's engines have dealt a crippling blow to India's largest low-cost carrier IndiGo's business of late with almost eight hundred flights canceled since June.

New Delhi (Sputnik) - India's largest low-cost carrier IndiGo had to cancel hundreds of its flight on Friday as American aerospace manufacturer Pratt & Whitney's (P&W) engines powering the Airbus A-320 (NEO) encountered serious technical snags.

IndiGo has grounded at least eight NEOs following consistent flaws in the engine; the last one was grounded on Wednesday this week when engine number two of the aircraft NEO (VT-ITK) failed.

"Our 8 Neos are grounded. Our schedule was planned in the month of June itself pertaining to non-availability of these aircraft for the month of July, August and September. The affected passengers have already been accommodated with suitable options," an IndiGo spokesperson said.

The delivery of A 320 Neo aircraft to Indian operators started in the first quarter of 2016. Subsequently, operators started facing problem with the PW 1100G-JM engine fitted on these aircraft due to wearing of bearing seal plate and combustion chamber distress.

"Both Indigo and GoAir have confirmed that these issues have impacted the delivery of aircraft. Further, national carrier Air India has also experienced delay in deliveries of some A320 Neo aircraft fitted with CFM Leap 1A26 engines by few days due to non-availability of engines at Airbus facility," Jayant Sinha, India's Minister for Civil Aviation said.

Meanwhile, Airbus has assured India's Directorate General of Civil Aviation that it would soon address the combustion chamber distress problem. "Regrettably, there have been days when we have had to ground as many as nine A320 Neo (planes) due to lack of spare engines. While we do receive certain compensation from Pratt & Whitney for these groundings, the operational disruptions are quite challenging and we are not happy with that situation," Aditya Ghosh, IndiGo president, and whole-time director had said during the post-Q1 earnings call on July 31.

FlyViking innstiller driften - NRK

Synd, men ikke overraskende. Et firma som synes å ha vært etablert som hevn mot Widerøe, mer enn et foretak med sunn økonomisk drift, er ikke liv laga. Widerøe trenger konkurranse. Prisene for å fly i våre nordligste egne er hårreisende. (Red.)

FlyViking innstiller driften

FlyViking har ikke tjent nok penger, og har hatt store tekniske problemer.
FlyViking
Her er det første flyet til FlyViking i en hangar i Canada, før det ble flydd til Nord-Norge og satt inn i trafikk. Nå innstiller flyselskapet driften.
Foto: FlyViking

– Ikke økonomisk forsvarlig

Heine Richardsen
Heine Richardsen har ledet FlyViking siden september. Nå avvikles selskapet.
Foto: Rune Nordgård Andreassen / NRK
– Hovedårsaken til at vi har tatt denne beslutningen er at det ikke er økonomisk forsvarlig å drive videre med det materiellet vi har i dag. Videre vil en styrt avvikling innen rimelig tid gjøre oss i stand til å innstille driften i FlyViking AS, samtidig som verken kunder, leverandører, ansatte eller innleid personell blir skadelidende, sier styreleder Ola Olsen ei pressemelding.
FlyViking vil forsøke å opprettholde ruta Ørland - Oslo - Ørland med innleid fly og personell fra andre flyselskaper.
– Vi beklager de ulempene dette vil medføre for kundene som har kjøpt billetter med selskapet etter den 12. januar. Samtlige kunder bes ta kontakt med selskapet, slik at de kan få refundert sine kjøp i henhold til salgsbetingelser og passasjerrettigheter, sier daglig leder Heine Richardsen.

fredag 29. desember 2017

Drone - SureFly klar for pax - AVweb video


SureFly Passenger Drone To Launch
 
MARY GRADY
 
 

Workhorse Group, whose concept for a “manned drone” attracted lots of attention last summer at EAA AirVenture, announced this week the SureFly aircraft will fly for the first time on Jan. 8, at the CES consumer technology show in Las Vegas. SureFly says its two-seat vehicle will be safer, easier to fly and more affordable than a conventional helicopter. It’s driven by eight contra-rotating propellers fixed to four propeller arms. It can carry a payload of 400 pounds up to 70 miles at about 75 MPH, the company said. Early models will be pilot-operated, but future models will be capable of autonomous flight. The company is working toward full certification of the vehicle by late 2019.
The design leverages the battery packs developed by Workhorse for its electric road vehicles, the company says. A gas combustion engine generates electricity, and a parallel battery pack provides a redundant backup power source, eliminating the need for long charging periods between flights, the company says. It’s controlled by a single joystick. Workhorse Group also said this week it is spinning off its aviation division, which includes the SureFly aircraft, into a separate publicly traded company named SureFly Inc. “SureFly has been one of the most exciting products we've ever developed,” said company CEO Steve Burns. “We believe the decision to spin off SureFly into a separate entity will better facilitate the long-term growth of both companies.”
EHang also recently flew a public demo if its one-seat drone, flown by a remote operator. Click here for the video.

3D printing - Ny turboprop motor for mindre fly - AVweb video

GE Tests 3-D Printed Turboprop
 
RUSS NILES
 
 

GE Aviation announced Thursday it had successfully test run its partially 3-D printed Advanced Turboprop engine, which is set to power the Textron Denali single turboprop. Details of the test were scant in the GE press release but  “early indications show that we will meet or exceed all the performance numbers we have quoted for the engine,” said GE spokesman Brad Mottier. “We’re developing a real catalyst for the BGA market and we’re executing on plan. The integration of proven technologies has expedited the design, development and certification cycle of the engine.” The engine is a direct challenge to Pratt & Whitney Canada’s domination of the small-to-medium turboprop engine market and is scalable from 1,000 to 1,600 horsepower.
The engine was developed in concert with the Denali and by the time the new airframe, a direct challenge to the Pilatus PC-12 is ready the engine will have 2,000 test hours. Certification for both is planned for 2018. The engine was run at GE’s facility in Prague, Czech Republic. The engine is an outgrowth of GE’s purchase of the former Walter Aircraft Engines two years ago. GE has re-engineered the rugged and dependable design and introduced a lot of advanced manufacturing, including 3-D production of some main components that cut the parts count by more than 800. AVweb Editor-At-Large Paul Bertorelli had a look at the 3-D production of the engine in the following video.


 

torsdag 28. desember 2017

C-141 under restauration - Kenneth Olof Toy, Smyrna

Just in from my correspondent in Smyrna, near Atlanta, Georgia.
Clipping from Smyrna Neighbor.
Ken lives not far from Dobbins AFB. He was our PT instructor at Williams AFB in 1967/68.



Søket etter Malaysian MH370 fortsetter etter "no cure, no pay" prinsippet - NRK

Les hele artikkelen her: https://tinyurl.com/y8yzhbtj

Norsk skip skal lete etter passasjerflyet som forsvant

Nesten fire år etter at passasjerflyet fra Malaysia Airlines forsvant, blir det nå satt i gang et nytt søk. Søket skal gjennomføres med et norsk skip og med norsk teknologi.
MALAYSIA-MH370
NYTT SØK: Forskerne mener de vet hvor flyet 9M-MRO som fløy ruten MH370 natt til 8. mars 2014 er. Nå starter et nytt søk.
Foto: STRINGER / Reuters
Der skal det ta inn forsyninger og nytt mannskap. Kursen settes så mot et punkt i det sørlige Indiahavet.
Punktet er det mest sannsynlige stedet MH370 med 239 mennesker ombord styrtet natt til 8. mars 2014. Det opplyser (PDF) Australian Transport Safety Bureau.
Ocean Constructor
NORSK SKIP PÅ VEI: Seabed Constructor med hjemmehavn Bergen kom fram til Durban i dag tidlig. Snart skal det ut i søkeområdet.
Foto: Ocean Infinity

Ny metode

Skipet skal bruke seks norske undervannsroboter bygd av Kongsberg Maritime i Horten. Disse skal samarbeide med roboter som holder seg på overflaten.
Folkene i Seabed Constructor vil koordinere denne svermen av roboter for å lete etter flyvraket.
Tre par med roboter vil bevege seg på hver side av skipet. Det melder Hydro International.
Systemet gjør det mulig å undersøke et stort område på kort tid, forklarer det amerikanske selskapet, Ocean Infinity, som skal lede søket.
Hugin robot
AVANSERT ROBOT: Hugin-serien av undervannsroboter fra Kongsberg Maritime er utviklet for å kunne operere selvstendig på inntil seks kilometers dyp.
Foto: Kongsberg Maritime

onsdag 27. desember 2017

Future is bright for new aeroplane pilots - Curt Lewis

It's getting a lot more lucrative to become a pilot

Zack Tusing, 19, is working on his pilot's license. He's hoping to get hired by an airline by the time he's 21.

Zack Tusing is training to be a pilot. One of his favorite places to fly is a spot along the Hudson River, overlooking New York City. Sure, he says, it's a little scary hovering next to skyscrapers and being suspended over water in a one engine Cessna.

"Other than that, it's really cool," Tusing said. "Central Park is cool to see. Being right at the top of One World Trade Center is cool. You can see Yankee Stadium."

Tusing is 19, and he has been training to be a pilot since he was a toddler.

"When I was three or four, my dad would hook up, I think it was a Microsoft Flight Simulator 1995, on the computer, and I would just try to get the plane on the ground somewhere without crashing," he said.

When he took his first actual flying lesson at 13, the outlook for pilots wasn't great. It was 2011, and there had been a decade of turmoil in the airline industry - with downturns after 9/11 and during the recession. About 10,000 pilots were furloughed.

Entry-level pilot salaries were about $22,000 a year on average, according to the aviation advisory firm FAPA. Meanwhile, training could cost five times that, says Wendy Beckman, who runs the aerospace department at Middle Tennessee State University.

"You heard stories of people on food stamps and living at home and sleeping in crew lounges," Beckman said.

Infinity Flight Group, a flight training school, opened a few years ago with a three-plane fleet. Now it has 25 planes and it's having trouble keeping up with demand.

Tusing didn't want to give up his dream. In fall 2016, he enrolled in Penn State Abington's business program, with plans to get his pilot's license after graduation.

But there was a shift happening in the airline industry.

There's a mandatory retirement age for pilots: 65. That time has come for a lot of them, says Gregory John, who runs Infinity Flight Group, the pilot training school Tusing attends.

"It's estimated [that in] the next 10 years, half of all pilots will be retiring from major airlines," John said.

The big airlines, like American and United, have hired more than 4,000 pilots this year - an eightfold increase from just five years ago, according to FAPA.

A lot of those pilots come from the regional airlines. That's left the regionals with a pilot shortage. Last year, 35 percent of available pilot jobs at those airlines went unfilled, according to the Regional Airline Association. The regional airlines have had to up their game. They've more than doubled pilot starting pay, to almost $50,000 a year on average, according to FAPA. Regional airlines are also offering signing bonuses of up to $31,000, and they're helping to pay for flight training.

"They'll help pay for some of your flight training," John said. "They'll guarantee you a job."

Some are also relaxing their preference for a college degree. So in January, Zack Tusing dropped out of college to train as a pilot full time. Tusing has flown about 200 hours so far; he needs 1,500 to get hired at a commercial airline. He says it'll probably cost him $80,000 all told. But he sees a real future as a pilot.

Diamond is now Chinese - Curt Lewis

Wanfeng Aviation Industry Buys Diamond Aircraft Industries

Ben Chen, the new chairman of Diamond Aircraft Industies, welcomes Diamond employees to the Wanfeng Aviation family.

Hangzhou, China-based Wanfeng Aviation Industry has purchased Austria's Diamond Aircraft Industries. In late 2016, Wanfeng acquired a 60-percent stake in Diamond's manufacturing operation in Canada as well as rights to manufacture the seven-passenger DA62 twin and four-passenger DA40 single. The acquisition includes aero-diesel engine manufacturer Austro Engine.

Helicopter - The AW139 seems to be of a sound construction- Curt Lewis

AW139 global helicopter fleet reaches two million flight hours

The AW139 intermediate twin engine helicopter global fleet has reached an outstanding milestone of two million flight hours, across all operational scenarios on five continents, while performing a wide range of missions with commercial, government and military operators. This accomplishment was reached just three years after the achievement of the first million showing impressive reliability, effectiveness, safety and supportability across a range of missions.

AW139 helicopter in flightNearly 900 units of the AW139 are today in service by more than 300 customers in 80 countries worldwide. Leonardo Photo

With the AW139 fleet leader having exceeded 12,000 hours on a single aircraft, nearly 900 units are today in service out of over 1000 on order by more than 300 customers in 80 countries worldwide. The global reach of the AW139, assembled in Philadelphia and Vergiate, has resulted in the type becoming a benchmark as the best-selling helicopter in its weight category and the most successful helicopter programme in the last 15 years. The type covers the widest range of applications with high flexibility including SAR, EMS, law enforcement and homeland security, patrol, firefighting, disaster relief, offshore transport, VIP/Corporate transport, utility and military duties.

This latest operational achievement is the combined result of the AW139's design, quality, performance and market success as well as Company's capability in supporting the worldwide fleet. The two million flight hour milestone was made possible through the variety of Leonardo services and support packages and the extended support network distributed in geographies around the world.

The AW139 complies with the latest certification and safety standards, offering outstanding overall performance with impressive power margin and one engine inoperative capability and also with a certified 60+ MGB 'run dry' capability which provides the highest standard in terms of safety.

Designed to allow high versatility and customized solutions, the AW139 is available with more than 1000 certified equipment options. Among some of the latest innovative systems available for the type are the LIPS and FIPS(Limited and Full Icing Protection Systems, respectively), and the OPLS (Obstacle Proximity Lidar System) that enhance mission capability and safety.

The AW139 has significantly grown its capabilities in years. This includes a maximum take-off weight extension (MTOW) to 7,000 kg for newly built and retrofitted aircraft, and as a result, new Cat A offshore enhanced procedures, avionic suite releases delivering ADSB-Out (automated dependent surveillance-broadcast), TCAS II (Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System), RNP performance (Required Navigation Performance), EGPWS update (Enhanced Ground Proximity System), Wide Area Augmentation System/Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance, and many other features.

Supportability has also been strengthened. A 30 percent reduction in maintenance time has been achieved with a dedicated Service Excellence initiative. Leonardo has established a Reliability Data Sharing Group (RDSG) and has launched a Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM) as additional services. Since its certification in 2004, approximately 5,300 pilots and 7,700 technicians have been trained with over 150,000 simulator hours logged to date.

The AW139 helicopter is part of the family of new generation helicopters produced by Leonardo that also includes the AW169 and AW189. These models all possess the same high-performance flight characteristics and safety features whilst sharing the same common cockpit concept and design philosophy. This approach facilitates synergies for operators of these types in areas such as training, maintenance and support. The AW139 design, success and experience have been key to the development of these latest additions to the product range and the family concept itself.

Close call over Belgium - Air Prox - Curt Lewis

EgyptAir crew reacted wrongly to collision-avoidance orders (01JAN2017 - Belgium)

Belgian investigators have disclosed that the crew of a climbing EgyptAir Airbus A300-600 freighter misunderstood an instruction to level off from its collision-avoidance system before a serious airprox involving an Air France A320.

The A300, flying east from Ostend to Cairo on airway UL607, had been cleared to 21,000ft after take-off and was climbing at 2,500ft/min.

Belgium's Air Accident Investigation Unit says the A300 was set to pass behind the northbound A320 which was flying on airway UN873 at the higher level of 22,000ft. The controller instructed the A320 to diverge left from the airway, towards a waypoint designated FERDI, to speed its crossing.

Although the A300 crew had been advised about the A320, which would cross from right to left above them, and had correctly read back instructions to maintain 21,000ft, the freighter continued to climb.

Both aircraft issued collision-avoidance advisories, with the A300 crew ordered to level off, having not shown any "visible change" of vertical speed as the jets approached.

Investigators state that the A300 crew later claimed to have "understood a 'climb' instruction". The captain took control from the autopilot and, instead of levelling the aircraft, increased its climb rate to 3,500ft/min.

The A320 crew obeyed a corresponding collision-avoidance advistory to climb, and initiated a climb at 1,500ft/min.

As the A300 passed above its cleared level and reached 21,300ft, its colliison-avoidance system started ordering the crew to descend. But the captain only reduced the climb rate instead of commencing the required 1,500ft/min descent.

The A300 had still been climbing when the A320 passed 1.2nm in front, and 522ft above.

Investigators state that the aircraft were separated by 0.69nm horizontally and 427ft vertically at their closest approach point.

"Both aircraft cover this distance in 4s when flying at cruise speed," the inquiry points out.

While investigators have yet to reach formal conclusions over the 1 January incident, pan-European air navigation organisation Eurocontrol has simulated the encounter to explore alternative scenarios.

If the A300 crew had responded correctly to the 'level off' order, the aircraft would have probably levelled between 20,700ft and 20,900ft depending on the pilots' promptness. No advisory would have been issued to the A320 crew.

But if the A300 had continued to climb as recorded during the incident, and the A320 crew had not responded to their 'climb' order, the vertical separation between the two jets would have halved to just 215ft at their closest point of approach.

Den siste amerikanske jagerflyger fra 2. verdenskrig er død - AVweb


Pilot Who Flew Last WWII Mission Dies
 
RUSS NILES
 
 

The pilot who flew the last combat mission of the Second World War died in Florida last week of lung cancer at the age of 93. Army Air Force Lt. Jerry Yellin was with another aircraft attacking Japanese air bases on Aug. 15, 1945, when Emperor Hirohito announced the unconditional surrender of Japan. Yellin’s wingman, a younger pilot named Lt. Philip Schlamberg, whom Yellin was mentoring, was shot down and killed. Yellin didn’t know the war had ended until he landed in Iwo Jima as the radio transmission telling forces to stand down didn’t reach him.
Yellin left the Army a short time later with a Distinguished Flying Cross, an Air Medal and a serious case of post-traumatic stress disorder. He spent much of his life protesting war and trying to help fellow veterans who’d had trouble rejoining society after the war. In recent years he has been the national spokesman for the Spirit of ’45, a nonprofit organization that promotes the legacy of World War II veterans,

tirsdag 26. desember 2017

A-10 supporters asking for new wings - DDN

Lawmakers Push For Funding To Restart A-10 Wing Production



A group of 20 lawmakers led by Rep. Martha McSally (R-Ariz.) is urging leaders of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees to include funding in the final fiscal year 2018 defense spending package to buy new wings for the Air Force’s aging but heavily used A-10 Thunderbolt II close-air-support aircraft.
In a Dec. 15 letter, the group wrote that 110 A-10s, or more than a third of the fleet, will have to be grounded if they do not receive new wings, creating a “significant capability gap.” Those groundings could begin in 2018, as the old wings reach the end of their service lives.

The A-10 Warthog. Photo: Air Force.
The A-10 Warthog. Photo: Air Force.
The letter said the A-10, also known as the Warthog, remains a vital weapon against current and potential adversaries. In the fight against the Islamic State, for example, the A-10 has dropped about a fifth of all munitions, more than any other aircraft.
While the FY 2018 defense authorization act and the House-passed FY 2018 defense appropriations bill both contain provisions that would allow the Air Force to restart wing production, the Senate appropriations bill does not. Congress has not yet determined how or when it will produce a final version of the appropriations bill.
The letter is addressed to Sens. Thad Cochran (R-Miss.) and Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, and Reps. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.) and Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.), the chairman and ranking member of the House Appropriations Committee. It is copied to House and Senate leaders.
Besides McSally, the letter is signed by 17 House members and two senators. McSally is a member of the House Armed Services Committee and a former A-10 pilot.
The A-10 fleet consists of 283 aircraft, of which 173 have already received new wings. When the Air Force was considering retiring the fleet, the wing production contract expired, leaving 110 aircraft without new wings, the letter said. But the Air Force now intends to keep flying the Warthog.
"Now that the Air Force has confirmed that it plans to maintain the A-10 fleet well into the foreseeable future, the remaining 110 wing sets must be delivered as soon as possible," the letter said.
The A-10 was built by Fairchild Republic, now part of Northrop Grumman [NOC].

test

With fears of a Soviet airstrike widespread, the airmen of the RAF maintained an eclectic collection of aircraft prepared at any moment to intercept hostile targets or strike targets deep within the eastern bloc.
These highly evocative colour images from a single remarkable Air Ministry collection give a unique insight into the service life of British flyers between 1950 and 1970, a time of great peril for the whole western world.
The names of the extraordinary aircraft they flew, which included the British-designed Hunter, Lightning, Vulcan and Canberra, became synonymous with the Cold War between the West and the Soviet Union. 
Right at the heart of the force were the elite crews of the iconic V-Force of nuclear bombers, who were trained to perform the ultimate mission of dropping the deadly nuclear payload. 
These pictures have been gathered together in The Royal Air Force in the Cold War, 1950-1970, by Ian Proctor, which also includes scenes of the RAF in action during colonial conflicts over the period.
These highly evocative colour images from a single remarkable Air Ministry collection give a unique insight into the Cold War service of British flyers between 1950 and 1970, a time of great peril for the whole western world. Pictured: Flight Lieutenant Ian Thomson of 111 Squadron stands by a Lightning F.1 at RAF Wattisham, in October 1962. Echoing wartime photography, this image of Thomson is typical of the way RAF pilots are portrayed as the successors to ¿The Few¿
These highly evocative colour images from a single remarkable Air Ministry collection give a unique insight into the Cold War service of British flyers between 1950 and 1970, a time of great peril for the whole western world. Pictured: Flight Lieutenant Ian Thomson of 111 Squadron stands by a Lightning F.1 at RAF Wattisham, in October 1962. Echoing wartime photography, this image of Thomson is typical of the way RAF pilots are portrayed as the successors to ‘The Few’
The crew of a Victor are seen silhouetted against the setting sun at RAF Marham in 1969, with the unique shape of the aircraft is instantly recognizable despite the low light. The V-Force formed the RAF¿s strategic nuclear deterrent from 1956 to 1969, perhaps not coincidentally reflecting the date range in which the majority of these photographs were taken. These images were gathered together in The Royal Air Force in the Cold War, 1950-1970, by Ian Proctor
The crew of a Victor are seen silhouetted against the setting sun at RAF Marham in 1969, with the unique shape of the aircraft is instantly recognizable despite the low light. The V-Force formed the RAF’s strategic nuclear deterrent from 1956 to 1969, perhaps not coincidentally reflecting the date range in which the majority of these photographs were taken. These images were gathered together in The Royal Air Force in the Cold War, 1950-1970, by Ian Proctor
A pilot climbs into a Lightning F.3 at RAF Wattisham, as a member of the ground crew passes to him his Taylor pressure helmet, c. 1965. Reflecting the RAF¿s pride in the Lightning shortly after its introduction to service in 1960, the Air Ministry made a recruitment film, ¿Streaked Lightning¿ appealing to men who may wish to fly the aircraft
A pilot climbs into a Lightning F.3 at RAF Wattisham, as a member of the ground crew passes to him his Taylor pressure helmet, c. 1965. Reflecting the RAF’s pride in the Lightning shortly after its introduction to service in 1960, the Air Ministry made a recruitment film, ‘Streaked Lightning’ appealing to men who may wish to fly the aircraft
Canberra B.6s, of 12 Squadron based at RAF Binbrook, are seen in flight in September 1958, with the squadron¿s fox head emblem visible on the aircraft¿s tails. Formed at Binbrook in June 1952, 12 Squadron was the third Bomber Command squadron to be equipped with the Canberra B.2. In May 1955, the squadron reequipped with the more powerful longer-ranged B.6
Canberra B.6s, of 12 Squadron based at RAF Binbrook, are seen in flight in September 1958, with the squadron’s fox head emblem visible on the aircraft’s tails. Formed at Binbrook in June 1952, 12 Squadron was the third Bomber Command squadron to be equipped with the Canberra B.2. In May 1955, the squadron reequipped with the more powerful longer-ranged B.6
A Vulcan based at RAF Cottesmore releases a full bomb load of twenty one 1000lb bombs, during an exercise in 1965. As well as operating in the nuclear role each of the V-bombers had the capability to deliver conventional ordnance. The Valiant and theVulcan were both able to carry twenty-one 1,000lb bombs, while the Victor carried thirty. Approximately twice a year each V-Force crew would undertake live bombing exercises
A Vulcan based at RAF Cottesmore releases a full bomb load of twenty one 1000lb bombs, during an exercise in 1965. As well as operating in the nuclear role each of the V-bombers had the capability to deliver conventional ordnance. The Valiant and theVulcan were both able to carry twenty-one 1,000lb bombs, while the Victor carried thirty. Approximately twice a year each V-Force crew would undertake live bombing exercises
RAF ¿At Home¿ days enabled RAF stations to showcase their work to visiting members of the public. Examples of fighters from the Spitfire to the most recent in service were displayed and flown. At RAF Coltishall¿s ¿At Home¿ day in September 1960, five aircraft were assembled to mark the 20th anniversary of the Battle of Britain
RAF ‘At Home’ days enabled RAF stations to showcase their work to visiting members of the public. Examples of fighters from the Spitfire to the most recent in service were displayed and flown. At RAF Coltishall’s ‘At Home’ day in September 1960, five aircraft were assembled to mark the 20th anniversary of the Battle of Britain
As the youngest of the armed services, the RAF was keen to promote its short yet distinguished heritage. At the parade to mark the disbanding of Fighter Command held at RAF Bentley Priory on 30 April 1968, Air Marshal Sir Frederick Rosier KCB CBE DSO ADC, the last Air Officer Commander-in-Chief (AOCinC) of the command stands with several of the most famous Second World War aces, from left to right: Air Vice Marshal ¿Johnny¿ Johnson, Group Captain P. W. Townsend, Wing Commander R. R. S. Tuck (US), Air Commodore A. C. Deere  (US) and Group Captain Douglas Bader
As the youngest of the armed services, the RAF was keen to promote its short yet distinguished heritage. At the parade to mark the disbanding of Fighter Command held at RAF Bentley Priory on 30 April 1968, Air Marshal Sir Frederick Rosier KCB CBE DSO ADC, the last Air Officer Commander-in-Chief (AOCinC) of the command stands with several of the most famous Second World War aces, from left to right: Air Vice Marshal ‘Johnny’ Johnson, Group Captain P. W. Townsend, Wing Commander R. R. S. Tuck (US), Air Commodore A. C. Deere (US) and Group Captain Douglas Bader
Taken by an unknown photographer, Vulcan B.2 of 50 Squadron, RAF Cottesmore, leads in ¿Vic¿ formation four Lightning F.6s of 5 Squadron, RAF Binbrook, during a flight of April 1968, to mark the disbanding of Fighter and Bomber Commands and the formation of Strike Command. Little is known about the photographers who created most of these images. One, however, Malcolm (Mike) Chase was a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and an experienced photographer of aircraft in flight
Taken by an unknown photographer, Vulcan B.2 of 50 Squadron, RAF Cottesmore, leads in ‘Vic’ formation four Lightning F.6s of 5 Squadron, RAF Binbrook, during a flight of April 1968, to mark the disbanding of Fighter and Bomber Commands and the formation of Strike Command. Little is known about the photographers who created most of these images. One, however, Malcolm (Mike) Chase was a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and an experienced photographer of aircraft in flight
A Vampire of 5 Squadron, seen with its Goblin engine characteristically torching on starting up, at RAF West Malling, 2 February 1952. Despite being a popular aircraft, the Vampire was not comfortable to fly. Within the cramped cockpit the pilot and navigator and radar operator sat side by side, the discomfort relieved by the pilot being positioned just slightly forward
A Vampire of 5 Squadron, seen with its Goblin engine characteristically torching on starting up, at RAF West Malling, 2 February 1952. Despite being a popular aircraft, the Vampire was not comfortable to fly. Within the cramped cockpit the pilot and navigator and radar operator sat side by side, the discomfort relieved by the pilot being positioned just slightly forward
A Lightning F.1A of 111 Squadron, armed with Firestreak missiles, is seen under floodlight preparing for a night sortie at RAF Wattisham in the summer of 1965. Wattisham was an important Cold War air defence station having, between 1950 and 1970, been at times home to squadrons of Meteors, Hunters, Javelins and Lightnings. By 1965, Wattisham was one of two stations maintaining QRA (South), alternating with RAF Binbrook, intercepting unidentified aircraft approaching from the east
A Lightning F.1A of 111 Squadron, armed with Firestreak missiles, is seen under floodlight preparing for a night sortie at RAF Wattisham in the summer of 1965. Wattisham was an important Cold War air defence station having, between 1950 and 1970, been at times home to squadrons of Meteors, Hunters, Javelins and Lightnings. By 1965, Wattisham was one of two stations maintaining QRA (South), alternating with RAF Binbrook, intercepting unidentified aircraft approaching from the east
Crew of a Javelin at RAF Geilenkirchen, Germany, in April 1963. Maintaining a heightened alert state was a major undertaking. John Farley, a Hunter pilot of 4 Squadron at RAF Jever during the late-1950s recalled: ¿it was 21¿22 days a month that you were on some sort of formal standby duty on your squadron. It wasn¿t always you on the Battle Flight aeroplanes, but there were duty people in the hangar, duty people in the Ops Room, we were at a very high and continuous state of readiness'
Crew of a Javelin at RAF Geilenkirchen, Germany, in April 1963. Maintaining a heightened alert state was a major undertaking. John Farley, a Hunter pilot of 4 Squadron at RAF Jever during the late-1950s recalled: ‘it was 21–22 days a month that you were on some sort of formal standby duty on your squadron. It wasn’t always you on the Battle Flight aeroplanes, but there were duty people in the hangar, duty people in the Ops Room, we were at a very high and continuous state of readiness'
A Lightning  based at RAF Leaconfield is seen demonstrating its impressive climb ability over the East Yorkshire countryside in September 1965. Later that month, 19 Squadron became the first Lightning squadron to be deployed to RAF Germany, replacing 5 Squadron, which had reformed in the UK, also with Lightnings at RAF Binbrook
A Lightning based at RAF Leaconfield is seen demonstrating its impressive climb ability over the East Yorkshire countryside in September 1965. Later that month, 19 Squadron became the first Lightning squadron to be deployed to RAF Germany, replacing 5 Squadron, which had reformed in the UK, also with Lightnings at RAF Binbrook
The three V-bombers in flight together, 13 January 1958, soon after the introduction to service of the final aircraft, the Victor. The different design responses to the Air Staff ¿s 1946 specification are clearly seen. The first Victor, is seen on the left led by a Vulcan, with a Valiant of 214 Squadron on the right
The three V-bombers in flight together, 13 January 1958, soon after the introduction to service of the final aircraft, the Victor. The different design responses to the Air Staff ’s 1946 specification are clearly seen. The first Victor, is seen on the left led by a Vulcan, with a Valiant of 214 Squadron on the right
The navigator-plotter of a Victor at RAF Cottesmore, seen in position through the window of the visual bomb aiming position, June 1959. Each of the three V-bombers had a visual bombing position that gave the bomb aimer an optically flat view of the ground below. This allowed, in clear weather, more accurate visual targeting, even at altitudes of over 50,000ft
The navigator-plotter of a Victor at RAF Cottesmore, seen in position through the window of the visual bomb aiming position, June 1959. Each of the three V-bombers had a visual bombing position that gave the bomb aimer an optically flat view of the ground below. This allowed, in clear weather, more accurate visual targeting, even at altitudes of over 50,000ft
Three Vulcans, carrying Blue Steel training rounds, demonstrate a dispersal scramble at RAF Scampton on 9 August 1963. From the late 1950s, to protect the V-Force from a pre-emptive strike, aircraft could be dispersed to twenty-six airfields across the UK. In addition to twice monthly exercises to test QRA readiness, Exercise Mickey Finn was held at least once a year, when all aircraft at a station, and occasionally the entire V-Force, were dispersed simultaneously
Three Vulcans, carrying Blue Steel training rounds, demonstrate a dispersal scramble at RAF Scampton on 9 August 1963. From the late 1950s, to protect the V-Force from a pre-emptive strike, aircraft could be dispersed to twenty-six airfields across the UK. In addition to twice monthly exercises to test QRA readiness, Exercise Mickey Finn was held at least once a year, when all aircraft at a station, and occasionally the entire V-Force, were dispersed simultaneously
A Vulan from 101 Squadron based at RAF Finningley, flies over Mount Kenya during a ¿Lone Ranger¿ flight to Nairobi in July 1960. An established part of the training for V-Force aircrew and crew chiefs, Lone Rangers were unsupported single aircraft detachments to destinations around the world, including Cyprus, Malta, Singapore and Australia. These were exercises in self-sufficiency as servicing facilities were usually not available and all maintenance was undertaken by the crew
A Vulan from 101 Squadron based at RAF Finningley, flies over Mount Kenya during a ‘Lone Ranger’ flight to Nairobi in July 1960. An established part of the training for V-Force aircrew and crew chiefs, Lone Rangers were unsupported single aircraft detachments to destinations around the world, including Cyprus, Malta, Singapore and Australia. These were exercises in self-sufficiency as servicing facilities were usually not available and all maintenance was undertaken by the crew
A Canberra being ¿bombed up¿ at RAF Tengah while on detachment from the Near East Air Force Strike Wing at Akrotiri, between May and August 1965. In May 1955 during the Malayan Emergency, Canberra B.6s of 101 Squadron deployed to RAF Changi, the RAF¿s first jet bombers to go into combat. Later, Canberra squadrons from Germany and Cyprus were regularly deployed to reinforce local units during times of tension against Malaysia
A Canberra being ‘bombed up’ at RAF Tengah while on detachment from the Near East Air Force Strike Wing at Akrotiri, between May and August 1965. In May 1955 during the Malayan Emergency, Canberra B.6s of 101 Squadron deployed to RAF Changi, the RAF’s first jet bombers to go into combat. Later, Canberra squadrons from Germany and Cyprus were regularly deployed to reinforce local units during times of tension against Malaysia
Flight Lieutenant Roger Pyrah, commanding officer of 1417 Flight, climbs into his Hunter at RAF Khormaksar before undertaking a tactical photographic reconnaissance flight over Radfan, July 1964. No. 1417 Flight was established with four Hunter FR.10s in May 1963, to provide tactical reconnaissance on behalf of the pilots of ground attack Hunter FGA.9s from 8, 208 and 43 Squadrons
Flight Lieutenant Roger Pyrah, commanding officer of 1417 Flight, climbs into his Hunter at RAF Khormaksar before undertaking a tactical photographic reconnaissance flight over Radfan, July 1964. No. 1417 Flight was established with four Hunter FR.10s in May 1963, to provide tactical reconnaissance on behalf of the pilots of ground attack Hunter FGA.9s from 8, 208 and 43 Squadrons
A Victor seen in flight over the Malaysian jungle in 1965 on an Operation Chamfrom deployment to RAF Tengah during the Indonesian Confrontation. Following the success of Profiteer detachments by Valiants and Vulcans during the Malayan Emergency, under Chamfrom four V-bombers were sent to Singapore to provide a show of potential retaliatory force, should the Indonesian Air Force decide to strike targets on mainland Malaysia
A Victor seen in flight over the Malaysian jungle in 1965 on an Operation Chamfrom deployment to RAF Tengah during the Indonesian Confrontation. Following the success of Profiteer detachments by Valiants and Vulcans during the Malayan Emergency, under Chamfrom four V-bombers were sent to Singapore to provide a show of potential retaliatory force, should the Indonesian Air Force decide to strike targets on mainland Malaysia
A Twin Pioneer based at RAF Eastleigh, Nairobi, overflies an RAF Regiment command post in the Kenyan bush, 1961. The Twin Pioneer was used for colonial policing and humanitarian operations, including in Aden, Kenya, Malaya and Borneo. It was able to carry cargo or sixteen passengers internally, or an externally slung cargo load. For policing duties, it could also be armed with Browning guns and door-mounted Bren guns and carry a small number of light bombs
A Twin Pioneer based at RAF Eastleigh, Nairobi, overflies an RAF Regiment command post in the Kenyan bush, 1961. The Twin Pioneer was used for colonial policing and humanitarian operations, including in Aden, Kenya, Malaya and Borneo. It was able to carry cargo or sixteen passengers internally, or an externally slung cargo load. For policing duties, it could also be armed with Browning guns and door-mounted Bren guns and carry a small number of light bombs
Three Jet Provost T.4s of the RAF College Cranwell¿s The Poachers¿, led by Squadron Leader Iain Panton, are seen climbing into an inverted loop for a publicity photograph in the summer of 1964. The photographer is probably flying in the team¿s fourth aircraft. After assembling several informal Provost teams since 1961, in 1963, a four-ship team called The Poachers, led by Squadron Leader Panton was founded as the RAF College¿s display team, in place of the previous Vampire team
Three Jet Provost T.4s of the RAF College Cranwell’s The Poachers’, led by Squadron Leader Iain Panton, are seen climbing into an inverted loop for a publicity photograph in the summer of 1964. The photographer is probably flying in the team’s fourth aircraft. After assembling several informal Provost teams since 1961, in 1963, a four-ship team called The Poachers, led by Squadron Leader Panton was founded as the RAF College’s display team, in place of the previous Vampire team
Five Folland Gnat T.1s from 4 FTS, RAF Valley, practise an inverted loop in ¿T¿ formation, over Holyhead in 1964. Introduced to the RAF in 1962, against expectations the Gnat was found to be an excellent aerobatics aircraft. Flight Lieutenant Lee Jones: ¿The Gnat was delightful but sensitive, and much more difficult for formation aerobatics than the Hunter ¿ on the other hand by using 10 degrees flap and dropping the slipper tanks we had a perfect display aircraft
Newly established nine aircraft Red Arrows team of 1969 is seen flying in line abreast formation. The aircraft are wearing the new paint scheme that evolved between the 1966 and 1969 seasons, including a full red, white and blue tail fin added after the 1967 season and a white lightning flash forward of the engine air intake, suggested by Hanna and added at the end of the 1968 season. Establishing The Red Arrows as an independent unit allowed the pilots time to practise and perform, without the distraction of training duties
The Royal Air Force in the Cold War, 1950-1970, by Ian Proctor, is published by Pen and Sword, and on sale here


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Helicopter -NH90 down in Oman - ASN

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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 203381
Last updated: 26 December 2017

This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.


Date:25-DEC-2017
Time:
Type:Silhouette image of generic NH90 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
NHIndustries NH90 TTH
Owner/operator:Royal Air Force of Oman
Registration:
C/n / msn:
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 3
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:RAFO Musannah -   Oman
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Military
Departure airport:
Destination airport:
Narrative:
The military helicopter impacted the ground during a training mission for unknown reasons in Musannah Air Base. The navigator died, two pilots suffered minor injures.
NHIndustries NH90's are based on the Musannah Air Base, so its possible that the helicopter took off from there.